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2
Date Added: Aug 5, 2021
Date Added: Aug 5, 2021
Major genomic deletions in independent eukaryotic lineages have led to repeated ancestral loss of biosynthesis pathways for nine of the twenty canonical amino acids1. While the evolutionary forces driving these polyphyletic deletion events are not well understood, the consequence is that extant metazoans are unable to produce nine essential amino acids (EAAs). Previous studies have highlighted that EAA biosynthesis tends to be more energetically costly2,3, raising the possibility that these pathways were lost from organisms with access to abundant EAAs in the environment4,5. It is unclear whether present-day metazoans can reaccept these pathways to resurrect biosynthetic capabilities that were lost long ago or whether evolution has rendered EAA pathways incompatible with metazoan metabolism. Here, we report progress on a large-scale synthetic genomics effort to reestablish EAA biosynthetic functionality in a mammalian cell. We designed codon-optimized biosynthesis pathways based on genes mined from Escherichia coli. These pathways were de novo synthesized in 3 kilobase chunks, assembled in yeasto and genomically integrated into a Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell line. One synthetic pathway produced valine at a sufficient level for cell viability and proliferation, and thus represents a successful example of metazoan EAA biosynthesis restoration. This prototrophic CHO line grows in valine-free medium, and metabolomics using labeled precursors verified de novo biosynthesis of valine. RNA-seq profiling of the valine prototrophic CHO line showed that the synthetic pathway minimally disrupted the cellular transcriptome. Furthermore, valine prototrophic cells exhibited transcriptional signatures associated with rescue from nutritional starvation. This work demonstrates that mammalian metabolism is amenable to restoration of ancient core pathways, thus paving a path for genome-scale efforts to synthetically restore metabolic functions to the metazoan lineage.
20
Date Added: Sep 10, 2021
Date Added: Sep 10, 2021
Background We have shown previously that low‐density lipoprotein (LDL) can be oxidized in the lysosomes of macrophages, that this oxidation can be inhibited by cysteamine, an antioxidant that accumulates in lysosomes, and that this drug decreases atherosclerosis in LDL receptor–deficient mice fed a high‐fat diet. We have now performed a regression study with cysteamine, which is of more relevance to the treatment of human disease. Methods and Results LDL receptor–deficient mice were fed a high‐fat diet to induce atherosclerotic lesions. They were then reared on chow diet and drinking water containing cysteamine or plain drinking water. Aortic atherosclerosis was assessed, and samples of liver and skeletal muscle were analyzed. There was no regression of atherosclerosis in the control mice, but cysteamine caused regression of between 32% and 56% compared with the control group, depending on the site of the lesions. Cysteamine substantially increased markers of lesion stability, decreased ceroid, and greatly decreased oxidized phospholipids in the lesions. The liver lipid levels and expression of cluster of differentiation 68, acetyl–coenzyme A acetyltransferase 2, cytochromes P450 (CYP)27, and proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines were decreased by cysteamine. Skeletal muscle function and oxidative fibers were increased by cysteamine. There were no changes in the plasma total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, high‐density lipoprotein cholesterol, or triacylglycerol concentrations attributable to cysteamine. Conclusions Inhibiting the lysosomal oxidation of LDL in atherosclerotic lesions by antioxidants targeted at lysosomes causes the regression of atherosclerosis and improves liver and muscle characteristics in mice and might be a promising novel therapy for atherosclerosis in patients.
190
Date Added: Jul 15, 2021
Date Added: Jul 15, 2021
DeepMind presented remarkably accurate predictions at the recent CASP14 protein structure prediction assessment conference. We explored network architectures incorporating related ideas and obtained the best performance with a three-track network in which information at the 1D sequence level, the 2D distance map level, and the 3D coordinate level is successively transformed and integrated. The three-track network produces structure predictions with accuracies approaching those of DeepMind in CASP14, enables the rapid solution of challenging X-ray crystallography and cryo-EM structure modeling problems, and provides insights into the functions of proteins of currently unknown structure. The network also enables rapid generation of accurate protein-protein complex models from sequence information alone, short circuiting traditional approaches which require modeling of individual subunits followed by docking. We make the method available to the scientific community to speed biological research.
230
Date Added: Jun 17, 2021
Date Added: Jun 17, 2021
Genome-embedded ribonucleotides arrest replicative DNA polymerases (Pols) and cause DNA breaks. Whether mammalian DNA repair Pols efficiently use template ribonucleotides and promote RNA-templated DNA repair synthesis remains unknown. We find that human Polθ reverse transcribes RNA, similar to retroviral reverse transcriptases (RTs). Polθ exhibits a significantly higher velocity and fidelity of deoxyribonucleotide incorporation on RNA versus DNA. The 3.2-Å crystal structure of Polθ on a DNA/RNA primer-template with bound deoxyribonucleotide reveals that the enzyme undergoes a major structural transformation within the thumb subdomain to accommodate A-form DNA/RNA and forms multiple hydrogen bonds with template ribose 2′-hydroxyl groups like retroviral RTs. Last, we find that Polθ promotes RNA-templated DNA repair in mammalian cells. These findings suggest that Polθ was selected to accommodate template ribonucleotides during DNA repair. Polθ reverse transcribes RNA by undergoing a significant conformational change and promotes RNA-templated DNA repair. Polθ reverse transcribes RNA by undergoing a significant conformational change and promotes RNA-templated DNA repair.
156
Date Added: Jul 15, 2021
Date Added: Jul 15, 2021
BACKGROUND Transthyretin amyloidosis, also called ATTR amyloidosis, is a life-threatening disease characterized by progressive accumulation of misfolded transthyretin (TTR) protein in tissues, predominantly the nerves and heart. NTLA-2001 is an in vivo gene-editing therapeutic agent that is designed to treat ATTR amyloidosis by reducing the concentration of TTR in serum. It is based on the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats and associated Cas9 endonuclease (CRISPR-Cas9) system and comprises a lipid nanoparticle encapsulating messenger RNA for Cas9 protein and a single guide RNA targeting TTR. METHODS After conducting preclinical in vitro and in vivo studies, we evaluated the safety and pharmacodynamic effects of single escalating doses of NTLA-2001 in six patients with hereditary ATTR amyloidosis with polyneuropathy, three in each of the two initial dose groups (0.1 mg per kilogram and 0.3 mg per kilogram), within an ongoing phase 1 clinical study. RESULTS Preclinical studies showed durable knockout of TTR after a single dose. Serial assessments of safety during the first 28 days after infusion in patients revealed few adverse events, and those that did occur were mild in grade. Dose-dependent pharmacodynamic effects were observed. At day 28, the mean reduction from baseline in serum TTR protein concentration was 52% (range, 47 to 56) in the group that received a dose of 0.1 mg per kilogram and was 87% (range, 80 to 96) in the group that received a dose of 0.3 mg per kilogram. CONCLUSIONS In a small group of patients with hereditary ATTR amyloidosis with polyneuropathy, administration of NTLA-2001 was associated with only mild adverse events and led to decreases in serum TTR protein concentrations through targeted knockout of TTR. (Funded by Intellia Therapeutics and Regeneron Pharmaceuticals; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT04601051. opens in new tab.)
4
Date Added: Sep 6, 2021
Date Added: Sep 6, 2021
The three-dimensional organization of chromatin contributes to transcriptional control, but information about native chromatin distribution is limited. Imaging chromatin in live Drosophila larvae, with preserved nuclear volume, revealed that active and repressed chromatin separates from the nuclear interior and forms a peripheral layer underneath the nuclear lamina. This is in contrast to the current view that chromatin distributes throughout the nucleus. Furthermore, peripheral chromatin organization was observed in distinct Drosophila tissues, as well as in live human effector T lymphocytes and neutrophils. Lamin A/C up-regulation resulted in chromatin collapse toward the nuclear center and correlated with a significant reduction in the levels of active chromatin. Physical modeling suggests that binding of lamina-associated domains combined with chromatin self-attractive interactions recapitulate the experimental chromatin distribution profiles. Together, our findings reveal a novel mode of mesoscale organization of peripheral chromatin sensitive to lamina composition, which is evolutionary conserved.
3
Date Added: Aug 4, 2021
Date Added: Aug 4, 2021
The multidimensional nature of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has been consistently reported. Clinical and biological characteristics have been associated with OCD dimensions in different ways. Studies suggest the existence of specific genetic bases for the different OCD dimensions. In this study, we analyze the genomic markers, genes, gene ontology and biological pathways associated with the presence of aggressive/checking, symmetry/order, contamination/cleaning, hoarding, and sexual/religious symptoms, as assessed via the Dimensional Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (DY-BOCS) in 399 probands. Logistic regression analyses were performed at the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) level. Gene-based and enrichment analyses were carried out for common (SNPs) and rare variants. No SNP was associated with any dimension at a genome-wide level (p 
3
Date Added: Aug 2, 2021
Date Added: Aug 2, 2021
How do antidepressants elicit an antidepressant response? Here, we review accumulating evidence that the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) serves as a transducer, acting as the link between the antidepressant drug and the neuroplastic changes that result in the improvement of the depressive symptoms. Over the last decade several studies have consistently highlighted BDNF as a key player in antidepressant action. An increase in hippocampal and cortical expression of BDNF mRNA parallels the antidepressant-like response of conventional antidepressants such as SSRIs. Subsequent studies showed that a single bilateral infusion of BDNF into the ventricles or directly into the hippocampus is sufficient to induce a relatively rapid and sustained antidepressant-like effect. Importantly, the antidepressant-like response to conventional antidepressants is attenuated in mice where the BDNF signaling has been disrupted by genetic manipulations. Low dose ketamine, which has been found to induce a rapid antidepressant effect in patients with treatment-resistant depression, is also dependent on increased BDNF signaling. Ketamine transiently increases BDNF translation in hippocampus, leading to enhanced synaptic plasticity and synaptic strength. Ketamine has been shown to increase BDNF translation by blocking NMDA receptor activity at rest, thereby inhibiting calcium influx and subsequently halting eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2) kinase leading to a desuppression of protein translation, including BDNF translation. The antidepressant-like response of ketamine is abolished in BDNF and TrkB conditional knockout mice, eEF2 kinase knockout mice, in mice carrying the BDNF met/met allele, and by intra-cortical infusions of BDNF-neutralizing antibodies. In summary, current data suggests that conventional antidepressants and ketamine mediate their antidepressant-like effects by increasing BDNF in forebrain regions, in particular the hippocampus, making BDNF an essential determinant of antidepressant efficacy.
9
Date Added: Jun 29, 2021
Date Added: Jun 29, 2021
H-1 parvovirus (H-1PV) is a promising anticancer therapy. However, in-depth understanding of its life cycle, including the host cell factors needed for infectivity and oncolysis, is lacking. This understanding may guide the rational design of combination strategies, aid development of more effective viruses, and help identify biomarkers of susceptibility to H-1PV treatment. To identify the host cell factors involved, we carry out siRNA library screening using a druggable genome library. We identify one crucial modulator of H-1PV infection: laminin γ1 (LAMC1). Using loss- and gain-of-function studies, competition experiments, and ELISA, we validate LAMC1 and laminin family members as being essential to H-1PV cell attachment and entry. H-1PV binding to laminins is dependent on their sialic acid moieties and is inhibited by heparin. We show that laminins are differentially expressed in various tumour entities, including glioblastoma. We confirm the expression pattern of laminin γ1 in glioblastoma biopsies by immunohistochemistry. We also provide evidence of a direct correlation between LAMC1 expression levels and H-1PV oncolytic activity in 59 cancer cell lines and in 3D organotypic spheroid cultures with different sensitivities to H-1PV infection. These results support the idea that tumours with elevated levels of γ1 containing laminins are more susceptible to H-1PV-based therapies.
6
Date Added: Jun 3, 2021
Date Added: Jun 3, 2021
With a sharp increase in the cases of multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria all over the world, there is a huge demand to develop a new generation of antibiotic agents to fight against them. As an alternative to the traditional drug discovery route, we have designed an effective antibacterial agent by modifying an existing commercial antibiotic, kanamycin, conjugated on the surface of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). In this study, we report a single-step synthesis of kanamycin-capped AuNPs (Kan-AuNPs) utilizing the combined reducing and capping properties of kanamycin. While Kan-AuNPs have increased toxicity to a primate cell line (Vero 76), antibacterial assays showed dose-dependent broad spectrum activity of Kan-AuNPs against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria including Kanamycin resistant bacteria. Further, a significant reduction in the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC100) of Kan-AuNPs was observed when compared to free kanamycin against all the bacterial strains tested. Mechanistic studies using transmission electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy indicated that at least part of Kan-AuNPs increased efficacy may be through disrupting the bacterial envelope, resulting in the leakage of cytoplasmic content and the death of bacterial cells. Results of this study provide critical information about a novel method for the development of antibiotic capped AuNPs as potent next-generation antibacterial agents.