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Trending Papers in ecology

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Authors: Bastien Castagneyrol, Inge van Halder, Yasmine Kadiri, Laura Schillé, Hervé Jactel
Published: Jan 2021
Authors: Bastien Castagneyrol, Inge van Halder, Yasmine Kadiri, Laura Schillé, Hervé Jactel
Published: Jan 2021
  • Conspecific insect herbivores co-occurring on the same host plant interact both directly through interference competition and indirectly through exploitative competition, plant-mediated interactions and enemy-mediated interactions
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Ayodeji Olubuse
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Authors: Joseph S. Phillips, Lucas A. Nell, Jamieson C. Botsch
Published: Jan 2021
Authors: Joseph S. Phillips, Lucas A. Nell, Jamieson C. Botsch
Published: Jan 2021
  • Time-series data for ecological communities are increasingly available from long-term studies designed to track species responses to environmental change. However, classical multivariate methods for analyzing community composition have limited applicability for time series
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Ayodeji Olubuse
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Authors: Francesca Pittino, Michael Seeger, Roberto Azzoni, Roberto Ambrosini, Andrea Franzetti
Published: Jan 2021
Authors: Francesca Pittino, Michael Seeger, Roberto Azzoni, Roberto Ambrosini, Andrea Franzetti
Published: Jan 2021
Cryoconite holes, ponds full of melting water with a sediment on the bottom, are hotspot of biodiversity of glacier surface. They host a metabolically active bacterial community that is involved in different dynamics concerning glacier ecosystems. Indeed, they are responsible of organic matter production and with other microorganisms establish a real microecosystem. Cryoconite holes have been described in different areas of the world (e.g., Arctic, Antarctic, Alps, Himalaya), and with this study we will provide the first description of bacterial communities of cryoconite holes of the Andes in South America. We collected samples on three high elevation glaciers of the Andes (Iver, Iver East and Morado glaciers) and two Patagonian glaciers located at sea level (Exploradores glacier and Perito Moreno). Results show that the most abundant orders are Burkholderiales, Cytophagales, Sphingobacteriales, Actinomycetales, Pseudomonadales, Rhodospiarillales, Rhizobiales, Sphingomonadales and Bacteroidales, which have been reported on glaciers of other areas of the world, Bacterial communities change from one glacier to another and both water pH and O2 concentration affect bacterial communities composition.
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Ayodeji Olubuse
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Published: Jan 2021
Published: Jan 2021
Coevolution can sculpt remarkable trait similarity between mutualistic partners. Yet, it remains unclear which network topologies and selection regimes enhance such trait complementarity. To address this, we simulate coevolution in topologically-distinct net-works under a gradient of mutualistic selection strength. We describe three main insights. First, trait matching is jointly influenced by the strength of mutualistic selection and the structural properties of the network where coevolution is unfolding. Second, the strength of mutualistic selection determines the network descriptors better correlated with higher trait matching. When coevolution is weak, network modularity enhances trait matching, but when it is strong, network connectance amplifies trait matching. Third, the structural properties of networks outrank those of modules or species in determining the evolved degree of trait matching. Our findings suggest networks can both enhance or constrain trait complementary, depending on the strength of mutualistic selection.
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Ayodeji Olubuse
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From Paper: Assessing biomass and primary production of microphytobenthos in depositional coastal systems using spectral information
Authors: Pascalle Jacobs, Jaime Pitarch, Jacco C. Kromkamp, Catharina J.M. Philippart
Published: Jan 2021
From Paper: Assessing biomass and primary production of microphytobenthos in depositional coastal systems using spectral information
Authors: Pascalle Jacobs, Jaime Pitarch, Jacco C. Kromkamp, Catharina J.M. Philippart
Published: Jan 2021
  • Comparison to historical information revealed that primary productivity of microphytobenthos may vary at least fivefold due to variations in environmental conditions. Therefore, ongoing changes in environmental conditions and especially extreme events because of climate change will not only lead to changes in spatiotemporal patterns of benthic primary production but also to changes in biodiversity of life under water and ecosystem services including food supply. Satellite MPB data allows for adequate choices in selecting coastal biodiversity conservation and coastal food supply.
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Ayodeji Olubuse
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From Paper: Spatio-temporal evolution of urban thermal environment and its driving factors: Case study of Nanjing, China
Authors: Zhang Menghan, Dong Suocheng, Cheng Hao, Li Fujia
Published: Jan 2021
From Paper: Spatio-temporal evolution of urban thermal environment and its driving factors: Case study of Nanjing, China
Authors: Zhang Menghan, Dong Suocheng, Cheng Hao, Li Fujia
Published: Jan 2021
  • The research results will provide scientific and technological support for similar cities with typical heat island effect in the world to make urban planning and development decisions, and to govern and improve urban ecological environment.
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Ayodeji Olubuse
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Ayodeji Olubuse
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From Paper: Establishment of a closed artificial ecosystem to ensure human long-term survival on the moon
Authors: Fu, Yuming, et al
Published: Jan 2021
From Paper: Establishment of a closed artificial ecosystem to ensure human long-term survival on the moon
Authors: Fu, Yuming, et al
Published: Jan 2021
Bioregenerative life support system (BLSS) is a critical technology maintaining long-term human survival on the Moon or other extraterrestrial bodies. In the current study, we carried out a 370-day integrated high-closure experiment (“Lunar Palace 365” experiment) on the Earth in an upgraded ground-based BLSS experimental facility called “Lunar Palace 1”. This experiment was designed to develop techniques to run and adjust system stability under long-term operation and crew shift change conditions. Eight volunteering crew members were divided into two groups with three time phases: Group I stayed in the cabin for the initial 60-day phase; Group II inhabited the cabin instead for a record-breaking duration of 200 days as the second phase; Group I re-entered the cabin, replaced Group II and stayed for the last 105 days. Our results demonstrated the BLSS had excellent stability with a material closure degree of 98.2%. Levels of O , CO and trace harmful gases were well controlled within ranges optimal for crew health and plant production. The system exhibited a strong robustness and could quickly minimize effects of disturbances through self-feedback adjustments. The efficiency of plant production completely met the crew’s need of plant-based food. The purification efficiency of domestic and sanitary wastewater was up to irrigation standards, and the recovery rate of urine and solid waste achieved 99.7% and 67%, respectively. These results are valuable for further optimization of the BLSS in a lunar base and computer simulations of similar systems.
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Ayodeji Olubuse
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Authors: Catheline Y.M. Froehlich, O. Selma Klanten, Martin L. Hing, Mark Dowton, Marian Y.L. Wong
Published: Jan 2021
Authors: Catheline Y.M. Froehlich, O. Selma Klanten, Martin L. Hing, Mark Dowton, Marian Y.L. Wong
Published: Jan 2021
With the onset and increasing frequency of multiple disturbances, the recovery potential of critical ecosystem-building species and their mutual symbionts is threatened. Similar effects to both hosts and their symbionts following disturbances have been assumed. However, we report unequal declines between hosts and symbionts throughout multiple climate-driven disturbances in reef-building corals and cryptobenthic coral-dwelling gobies. Communities were surveyed before and after consecutive cyclones (2014, 2015) and heatwaves (2016, 2017). After cyclones, coral size and goby group size decreased similarly by 28-30%. After heatwave-induced bleaching, coral size decreased substantially (47%) and the few gobies recorded mostly inhabited corals singly. Despite several coral species still occurring after bleaching, all goby species declined, leaving 78% of corals uninhabited. These findings suggest that gobies, which are important mutual symbionts for corals, are unable to cope with consecutive disturbances. This disproportionate decline could lead to ecosystem-level disruptions through loss of key symbiotic services to corals.
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Ayodeji Olubuse
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From Paper: The effect of activity, energy use, and species identity on environmental DNA shedding of freshwater fish
Authors: Thalinger, Bettina, et al
Published: Jan 2021
From Paper: The effect of activity, energy use, and species identity on environmental DNA shedding of freshwater fish
Authors: Thalinger, Bettina, et al
Published: Jan 2021
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Ayodeji Olubuse
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Authors: Natalia I. Sandoval-Herrera, Gabriela F. Mastromonaco, Daniel J. Becker, Nancy B. Simmons, Kenneth C. Welch
Published: Jan 2021
Authors: Natalia I. Sandoval-Herrera, Gabriela F. Mastromonaco, Daniel J. Becker, Nancy B. Simmons, Kenneth C. Welch
Published: Jan 2021
Quantifying hair cortisol has become popular in wildlife ecology for its practical advantages for evaluating health. Before hair cortisol levels can be reliably interpreted however, it is key to first understand the intrinsic factors explaining intra- and interspecific variation. Bats are an ecologically diverse group of mammals that allow studying such variation. Given that many bat species are threatened or have declining populations in parts of their range, non-invasive tools for monitoring colony health and identifying cryptic stressors are needed to efficiently direct conservation efforts. Here we describe intra- and interspecific sources of variation in hair cortisol levels in 18 Neotropical bat species from Mexico and Belize. We found that fecundity is an important ecological trait explaining interspecific variation in bat hair cortisol. Other ecological variables such as colony size, roost durability, and basal metabolic rate did not explain hair cortisol variation among species. At the individual level, females exhibited higher hair cortisol levels than males, and the effect of body mass varied among species. Overall, our findings help validate and accurately apply hair cortisol as a monitoring tool in free-ranging bats.
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Ayodeji Olubuse
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