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37
Date Added: May 4, 2021
Authors: Christopher R. Berry, Anthony Fowler, Tamara Glazer, Samantha Handel-Meyer, Alec MacMillen
Date Added: May 4, 2021
Authors: Christopher R. Berry, Anthony Fowler, Tamara Glazer, Samantha Handel-Meyer, Alec MacMillen
We estimate the effects of shelter-in-place (SIP) orders during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. We do not find detectable effects of these policies on disease spread or deaths. We find small but measurable effects on mobility that dissipate over time. And we find small, delayed effects on unemployment. We conduct additional analyses that separately assess the effects of expanding versus withdrawing SIP orders and test whether there are spillover effects in other states. Our results are consistent with prior studies showing that SIP orders have accounted for a relatively small share of the mobility trends and economic disruptions associated with the pandemic. We reanalyze two prior studies purporting to show that SIP orders caused large reductions in disease prevalence, and show that those results are not reliable. Our results do not imply that social distancing behavior by individuals, as distinct from SIP policy, is ineffective.
4
Date Added: Apr 30, 2021
Authors: Floris Goerlandt, Jie Li, Genserik Reniers
Date Added: Apr 30, 2021
Authors: Floris Goerlandt, Jie Li, Genserik Reniers
34
Date Added: Apr 9, 2021
Authors: Alang, Sirry, et al
Date Added: Apr 9, 2021
Authors: Alang, Sirry, et al
29
Date Added: Mar 27, 2021
Authors: Maarten van Smeden, Johannes B Reitsma, Richard D Riley, Gary S Collins, Karel GM Moons
Date Added: Mar 27, 2021
Authors: Maarten van Smeden, Johannes B Reitsma, Richard D Riley, Gary S Collins, Karel GM Moons
1
Date Added: May 3, 2021
Authors: John D. Omura, Kathleen B. Watson, Fleetwood Loustalot, Janet E. Fulton, Susan A. Carlson
Date Added: May 3, 2021
Authors: John D. Omura, Kathleen B. Watson, Fleetwood Loustalot, Janet E. Fulton, Susan A. Carlson
1
Date Added: May 3, 2021
Authors: Kalei R. J. Hosaka, Max P. Castanera, Seiji Yamada
Date Added: May 3, 2021
Authors: Kalei R. J. Hosaka, Max P. Castanera, Seiji Yamada
By August 2020, non-Hawaiian Pacific Islanders—4% of Hawaii’s population—accounted for 30% of the cumulative COVID-19 cases in the state. Micronesians, mostly Chuukese and Marshallese, were the most severely affected. Disproportionate COVID-19 infection in racial or ethnic groups in the US occur because of socioeconomic factors. The COVID-19 pandemic can be thought of as a syndemic–where cases cluster “on a background of social and economic disparity”. In this brief report, we describe factors that put Chuukese and Marshallese at increased risk for COVID-19 in Hawaii. We show that Micronesians had increased risk for COVID-19 due to limited employment opportunities, housing insecurity, and underlying comorbid conditions in the context of rescinded federal health insurance and broken government promises. We also highlight the resiliency that many community members demonstrated in preventing new infections and supporting those infected. We conclude that COVID-19 in Hawaii should be understood as a syndemic, where Micronesians were disproportionately affected due to disparities in housing, employment, and health access. Our work supports efforts to continue addressing underlying socioeconomic disparities in creating a more equitable future for our Micronesian community in Hawaii.
3
Date Added: Apr 22, 2021
Authors: Gianluca Pescaroli, Luca Galbusera, Monica Cardarilli, Georgios Giannopoulos, David Alexander
Date Added: Apr 22, 2021
Authors: Gianluca Pescaroli, Luca Galbusera, Monica Cardarilli, Georgios Giannopoulos, David Alexander
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