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21
Date Added: May 1, 2021
Authors: Ravitej Uppu, Manashee Adhikary, Cornelis A. M. Harteveld, Willem L. Vos
Date Added: May 1, 2021
Authors: Ravitej Uppu, Manashee Adhikary, Cornelis A. M. Harteveld, Willem L. Vos
It is well known that waves with frequencies within the forbidden gap inside a crystal are transported only over a limited distance—the Bragg length—before being reflected by Bragg interference. Here, we demonstrate how to send waves much deeper into crystals in an exemplary study of light in two-dimensional silicon photonic crystals. By spatially shaping the wave fronts, the internal energy density—probed via the laterally scattered intensity—is enhanced at a tunable distance away from the front surface. The intensity is up to 100× enhanced compared to random wave fronts, and extends as far as 8× the Bragg length, which agrees with an extended mesoscopic model. We thus report a novel control knob for mesoscopic wave transport that pertains to any kind of waves.
5
Date Added: May 1, 2021
Authors: Chen, Xuefei, et al
Date Added: May 1, 2021
Authors: Chen, Xuefei, et al
Complex concentrated solutions of multiple principal elements are being widely investigated as high- or medium-entropy alloys (HEAs or MEAs)1–11, often assuming that these materials have the high configurational entropy of an ideal solution. However, enthalpic interactions among constituent elements are also expected at normal temperatures, resulting in various degrees of local chemical order12–22. Of the local chemical orders that can develop, chemical short-range order (CSRO) is arguably the most difficult to decipher and firm evidence of CSRO in these materials has been missing thus far16,22. Here we discover that, using an appropriate zone axis, micro/nanobeam diffraction, together with atomic-resolution imaging and chemical mapping via transmission electron microscopy, can explicitly reveal CSRO in a face-centred-cubic VCoNi concentrated solution. Our complementary suite of tools provides concrete information about the degree/extent of CSRO, atomic packing configuration and preferential occupancy of neighbouring lattice planes/sites by chemical species. Modelling of the CSRO order parameters and pair correlations over the nearest atomic shells indicates that the CSRO originates from the nearest-neighbour preference towards unlike (V−Co and V−Ni) pairs and avoidance of V−V pairs. Our findings offer a way of identifying CSRO in concentrated solution alloys. We also use atomic strain mapping to demonstrate the dislocation interactions enhanced by the CSROs, clarifying the effects of these CSROs on plasticity mechanisms and mechanical properties upon deformation.
22
Date Added: Apr 30, 2021
Authors: Zhendong Zhang, Liangchao Chen, Kai-Xuan Yao, Cheng Chin
Date Added: Apr 30, 2021
Authors: Zhendong Zhang, Liangchao Chen, Kai-Xuan Yao, Cheng Chin
Molecular quantum gases (that is, ultracold and dense molecular gases) have many potential applications, including quantum control of chemical reactions, precision measurements, quantum simulation and quantum information processing1–3. For molecules, to reach the quantum regime usually requires efficient cooling at high densities, which is frequently hindered by fast inelastic collisions that heat and deplete the population of molecules4,5. Here we report the preparation of two-dimensional Bose–Einstein condensates (BECs) of spinning molecules by inducing pairing interactions in an atomic condensate near a g-wave Feshbach resonance6. The trap geometry and the low temperature of the molecules help to reduce inelastic loss, ensuring thermal equilibrium. From the equation-of-state measurement, we determine the molecular scattering length to be + 220(±30) Bohr radii (95% confidence interval). We also investigate the unpairing dynamics in the strong coupling regime and find that near the Feshbach resonance the dynamical timescale is consistent with the unitarity limit. Our work demonstrates the long-sought transition between atomic and molecular condensates, the bosonic analogue of the crossover from a BEC to a Bardeen−Cooper−Schrieffer (BCS) superfluid in a Fermi gas7–9. In addition, our experiment may shed light on condensed pairs with orbital angular momentum, where a novel anisotropic superfluid with non-zero surface current is predicted10,11, such as the A phase of 3He.
2
Date Added: Apr 18, 2021
Authors: Sharma, Yogesh, et al
Date Added: Apr 18, 2021
Authors: Sharma, Yogesh, et al
Magnetic insulators are important materials for a range of next-generation memory and spintronic applications. Structural constraints in this class of devices generally require a clean heterointerface that allows effective magnetic coupling between the insulating layer and the conducting layer. However, there are relatively few examples of magnetic insulators that can be synthesized with surface qualities that would allow these smooth interfaces and precisely tuned interfacial magnetic exchange coupling, which might be applicable at room temperature. In this work, we demonstrate an example of how the configurational complexity in the magnetic insulator layer can be used to realize these properties. The entropy-assisted synthesis is used to create single-crystal (Mg0.2Ni0.2Fe0.2Co0.2Cu0.2)Fe2O4 films on substrates spanning a range of strain states. These films show smooth surfaces, high resistivity, and strong magnetic responses at room temperature. Local and global magnetic measurements further demonstrate how strain can be used to manipulate the magnetic texture and anisotropy. These findings provide insight into how precise magnetic responses can be designed using compositionally complex materials that may find application in next-generation magnetic devices.
13
Date Added: Apr 9, 2021
Authors: Saito, Yu, et al
Date Added: Apr 9, 2021
Authors: Saito, Yu, et al
In condensed-matter systems, higher temperatures typically disfavour ordered phases, leading to an upper critical temperature for magnetism, superconductivity and other phenomena. An exception is the Pomeranchuk effect in 3He, in which the liquid ground state freezes upon increasing the temperature1, owing to the large entropy of the paramagnetic solid phase. Here we show that a similar mechanism describes the finite-temperature dynamics of spin and valley isospins in magic-angle twisted bilayer graphene2. Notably, a resistivity peak appears at high temperatures near a superlattice filling factor of −1, despite no signs of a commensurate correlated phase appearing in the low-temperature limit. Tilted-field magnetotransport and thermodynamic measurements of the in-plane magnetic moment show that the resistivity peak is connected to a finite-field magnetic phase transition3 at which the system develops finite isospin polarization. These data are suggestive of a Pomeranchuk-type mechanism, in which the entropy of disordered isospin moments in the ferromagnetic phase stabilizes the phase relative to an isospin-unpolarized Fermi liquid phase at higher temperatures. We find the entropy, in units of Boltzmann’s constant, to be of the order of unity per unit cell area, with a measurable fraction that is suppressed by an in-plane magnetic field consistent with a contribution from disordered spins. In contrast to 3He, however, no discontinuities are observed in the thermodynamic quantities across this transition. Our findings imply a small isospin stiffness4,5, with implications for the nature of finite-temperature electron transport6–8, as well as for the mechanisms underlying isospin ordering and superconductivity9,10 in twisted bilayer graphene and related systems.
2
Date Added: Mar 24, 2021
Authors: Beloy, Kyle, et al
Date Added: Mar 24, 2021
Authors: Beloy, Kyle, et al
Atomic clocks are vital in a wide array of technologies and experiments, including tests of fundamental physics1. Clocks operating at optical frequencies have now demonstrated fractional stability and reproducibility at the 10−18 level, two orders of magnitude beyond their microwave predecessors2. Frequency ratio measurements between optical clocks are the basis for many of the applications that take advantage of this remarkable precision. However, the highest reported accuracy for frequency ratio measurements has remained largely unchanged for more than a decade3–5. Here we operate a network of optical clocks based on 27Al+ (ref. 6), 87Sr (ref. 7) and 171Yb (ref. 8), and measure their frequency ratios with fractional uncertainties at or below 8 × 10−18. Exploiting this precision, we derive improved constraints on the potential coupling of ultralight bosonic dark matter to standard model fields9,10. Our optical clock network utilizes not just optical fibre11, but also a 1.5-kilometre free-space link12,13. This advance in frequency ratio measurements lays the groundwork for future networks of mobile, airborne and remote optical clocks that will be used to test physical laws1, perform relativistic geodesy14 and substantially improve international timekeeping15.
2
Date Added: Mar 23, 2021
Authors: Scigliuzzo, Marco, et al
Date Added: Mar 23, 2021
Authors: Scigliuzzo, Marco, et al
The ability to control and measure the temperature of propagating microwave modes down to very low temperatures is indispensable for quantum information processing and may open opportunities for studies of heat transport at the nanoscale, also in the quantum regime. Here, we propose and experimentally demonstrate primary thermometry of propagating microwaves using a transmon-type superconducting circuit. Our device operates continuously, with a sensitivity down to 4×10−4 photons/Hz and a bandwidth of 40 MHz. We measure the thermal occupation of the modes of a highly attenuated coaxial cable in a range of 0.001 to 0.4 thermal photons, corresponding to a temperature range from 35 mK to 210 mK at a frequency around 5 GHz. To increase the radiation temperature in a controlled fashion, we either inject calibrated, wideband digital noise, or heat the device and its environment. This thermometry scheme can find applications in benchmarking and characterization of cryogenic microwave setups, temperature measurements in hybrid quantum systems, and quantum thermodynamics.
2
Date Added: Apr 22, 2021
Authors: Woods, Justin S., et al
Date Added: Apr 22, 2021
Authors: Woods, Justin S., et al
Artificial spin ices (ASI) have been widely investigated as magnetic metamaterials with exotic properties governed by their geometries. In parallel, interest in x-ray photon orbital angular momentum (OAM) has been rapidly growing. Here we show that a square ASI with a patterned topological defect, a double edge dislocation, imparts OAM to scattered x rays. Unlike single dislocations, a double dislocation does not introduce magnetic frustration, and the ASI equilibrates to its antiferromagnetic (AFM) ground state. The topological charge of the defect differs with respect to the structural and magnetic order; thus, x-ray diffraction from the ASI produces photons with even and odd OAM quantum numbers at the structural and AFM Bragg conditions, respectively. The magnetic transitions of the ASI allow the AFM OAM beams to be switched on and off by modest variations of temperature and applied magnetic field. These results demonstrate ASIs can serve as metasurfaces for reconfigurable x-ray optics that could enable selective probes of electronic and magnetic properties.
5
Date Added: Mar 20, 2021
Authors: Yang, Wenda, et al
Date Added: Mar 20, 2021
Authors: Yang, Wenda, et al
Ferroelectric topological objects provide a fertile ground for exploring emerging physical properties that could potentially be utilized in future nanoelectronic devices. Here, we demonstrate quasi-one-dimensional metallic high conduction channels associated with the topological cores of quadrant vortex domain and center domain (monopole-like) states confined in high quality BiFeO3 nanoislands, abbreviated as the vortex core and the center core. We unveil via the phase-field simulation that the superfine metallic conduction channels along the center cores arise from the screening charge carriers confined at the core region, whereas the high conductance of vortex cores results from a field-induced twisted state. These conducting channels can be reversibly created and deleted by manipulating the two topological states via electric field, leading to an apparent electroresistance effect with an on/off ratio higher than 103. These results open up the possibility of utilizing these functional one-dimensional topological objects in high-density nanoelectronic devices, e.g. nonvolatile memory.
21
Date Added: Apr 9, 2021
Authors: Rozen, Asaf, et al
Date Added: Apr 9, 2021
Authors: Rozen, Asaf, et al
In the 1950s, Pomeranchuk1 predicted that, counterintuitively, liquid 3He may solidify on heating. This effect arises owing to high excess nuclear spin entropy in the solid phase, where the atoms are spatially localized. Here we find that an analogous effect occurs in magic-angle twisted bilayer graphene2–6. Using both local and global electronic entropy measurements, we show that near a filling of one electron per moiré unit cell, there is a marked increase in the electronic entropy to about 1kB per unit cell (kB is the Boltzmann constant). This large excess entropy is quenched by an in-plane magnetic field, pointing to its magnetic origin. A sharp drop in the compressibility as a function of the electron density, associated with a reset of the Fermi level back to the vicinity of the Dirac point, marks a clear boundary between two phases. We map this jump as a function of electron density, temperature and magnetic field. This reveals a phase diagram that is consistent with a Pomeranchuk-like temperature- and field-driven transition from a low-entropy electronic liquid to a high-entropy correlated state with nearly free magnetic moments. The correlated state features an unusual combination of seemingly contradictory properties, some associated with itinerant electrons—such as the absence of a thermodynamic gap, metallicity and a Dirac-like compressibility—and others associated with localized moments, such as a large entropy and its disappearance under a magnetic field. Moreover, the energy scales characterizing these two sets of properties are very different: whereas the compressibility jump has an onset at a temperature of about 30 kelvin, the bandwidth of magnetic excitations is about 3 kelvin or smaller. The hybrid nature of the present correlated state and the large separation of energy scales have implications for the thermodynamic and transport properties of the correlated states in twisted bilayer graphene.
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