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7
Authors: Yinyin Cao, Frits K. Pil, Benn Lawson
Published: Mar 2021
Authors: Yinyin Cao, Frits K. Pil, Benn Lawson
Published: Mar 2021
Purpose This study aims to provide insight on how work–life initiatives impact employees. Using corporate volunteer programs as an example, the authors examine the role of coworker social influence in shaping the reactions of both employee participants and non-participants of the program. The paper further identifies several factors that may moderate these relationships. Design/methodology/approach The authors surveyed employees before and after the implementation of a new corporate work–life initiative. 99 employees provided data pre and post. OLS regression and hierarchical linear modeling were used to test hypothesized relationships. Findings Even in the context of low participation, work–life initiatives engendered positive organization-related perceptions among employees. These positive outcomes were due in part to coworkers' sharing of their volunteer experiences and were most prominent for employees in positions that afforded flexibility, and employees who reported close ties with coworkers. Practical implications The study deepens our understanding of employee reactions to work–life programs and underlines the importance of these programs even when employee participation is low. The role of coworker influence as a determinant of employee reactions suggests there may be value in purposefully fostering participants' sharing of volunteer experiences in the workplace. Originality/value This study takes a unique approach to examining the role of coworker influence in shaping employee reactions to corporate initiatives.
1
Authors: Saurabh Verma, Satya N. Mandal, Spenser Robinson, Deepak Bajaj, Anupam Saxena
Published: Mar 2021
Authors: Saurabh Verma, Satya N. Mandal, Spenser Robinson, Deepak Bajaj, Anupam Saxena
Published: Mar 2021
Purpose This case study aims to appraise the financial benefits of green building construction in developing countries. The case study presents, green building's positive net present value (NPV) investment in real terms and potentially enhanced stock market returns at the firm level compared to competitors. Design/methodology/approach The case study examines secondary data on a green building certification and longitudinal operation costs to estimate green building investments' financial benefits. The case study also compares the stock market performance of green building portfolio company with non-green building competitors of similar size and industry. Findings The case study finds out that the real return rate on green building investment is higher than the weighted average cost of capital (WACC) of the company with an inflation-adjusted payback period of fewer than ten years. Findings compare favourably to the extant literature which was mostly in developed economies. The paper further highlights that stock market performance for a green building focused company shows improved returns to shareholders relative to non-green competitors. Research limitations/implications The results are specific to the time and building researched; green buildings costs have reduced over time, and a new study may show improved case study findings. The case study results on stock market performance are indicative and may need further research for evaluation. Practical implications The case study presents a model for critical appraisal of green buildings investment. The paper further indicates that green building investment may lead to operational savings and superior stock performance compared to competitors. Originality/value The paper presents a green building investment appraisal model which might be useful for the industry and academia. Developing countries have limited literature on green buildings' financial benefits; this case study quantifies the financial benefits and compares them with the available literature related to developed economies’ green buildings.
1
Authors: Siwalik Mishra, Sonali Bhattacharya
Published: Mar 2021
Authors: Siwalik Mishra, Sonali Bhattacharya
Published: Mar 2021
Purpose The purpose of this study is to identify and understand key strategies relating to the staffing, employee experience and employer branding of an inventive startup in robotics training and consumer robotics manufacturing space, keeping in mind the constraints and challenges faced by the company right from the beginning to date. Design/methodology/approach A case-based method approach has been used. The Founder-Chief executive officer was interviewed multiple times. Interviews were transcribed for further analysis. Data was also sourced from the company website, news and digital media reports. Findings Human resource strategies used by the company in venturing out in this niche market were explored and linked to the concepts of staffing, employee experience and employer branding. This case can be used for teaching the human resource challenges of a growing start-up. Practical implications With the help of this case, readers may be able to appreciate the practice of critical concepts of staffing and employee experience in a growing startup. Originality/value The premise of a budding start-up in a niche industry, such as robotics training in educational institutions and manufacturing of small-scale consumer robotics, adds to the novelty of the case.
1
Authors: Amir Asgari, Ali Khorsandi Taskoh, Saeed Ghiasi Nodooshan
Published: Mar 2021
Authors: Amir Asgari, Ali Khorsandi Taskoh, Saeed Ghiasi Nodooshan
Published: Mar 2021
Purpose This paper aims to introduce a conceptual model for the shaping of the innovation district under the anchor approach by extracting the specifications of the fourth-generation university. Design/methodology/approach This study selected 550 resources and reduced them to 190 to achieve the most appropriate resources. This study used a meta-synthesis analysis approach using a text-mining method due to the multidisciplinary and voluminous nature of contents. Findings The results first reveal the shaping process and the components of innovation districts, which are: innovational urban infrastructures, knowledge economy and competitiveness and academic development. Second, this study also shows the specifications of a fourth-generation university to shape innovation districts. Practical implications This study also informs the policymakers and researchers internationally about the implementation requirements of a fourth-generation university and the shaping mechanisms of an innovation district. Originality/value This paper is pioneer about two concepts, first, it shows the shaping process of an innovation district, providing a large-scale insight about the components and second, this illustrates for the first time the specifications of a fourth-generation University practically as an anchor institute to shape innovation district.
1
Authors: Khatibi, Hamed, et al
Published: Mar 2021
Authors: Khatibi, Hamed, et al
Published: Mar 2021
Purpose The study aims to use DfX to develop a comprehensive database of smart and resilient indicators that assists city administrators and authorities alike. The Smart and Resilient Cities Indicators Bank (SRCIB) will identify the level of smart and resilience determinants that will simultaneously provide ways to improve the city's infrastructure to meet smart and resilient objectives. Design/methodology/approach Design of excellence (DfX) is adopted in dissecting from four best indicators of established systems, and a database of indicators is developed and specified in diverse ways. A new indicator system is then created for smart and resilient cities. Findings The proposed indicator bank consists of four layers consisting of dimension, sub-dimension, key issues and the number of indicators resulting from four different indicator systems that the study have analysed. Research limitations/implications The proposed indicator bank is an exploratory approach that needs to be tested in a real scenario because the urban systems are complex inter-related systems with too many variables that may influence actual outcomes. Thus, the proposed indicators bank does not attempt to quantify or solve related urban issues commonly address in smart and resilient city concepts but more to enhance the management of attaining towards smart and resilient specifications. Practical implications The proposed indicator bank is an exploratory approach that needs to be tested in a real scenario because the urban systems are complex inter-related systems with too many variables that may influence actual outcomes. Thus, the proposed indicators bank does not attempt to quantify or solve related urban issues commonly address smart and resilient city concepts but more to enhance the management of attaining smart and resilient specifications. Originality/value The study builds a robust guide for assessing smart and resilient cities that is yet a widely accessible assessment framework. The proposed SRCIB allows local authorities and relevant stakeholders of typical cities to better manage its urban agenda towards smart and resilient city objectives when specific indicators are defined. Besides, a smart city can become resilient; likewise, a resilient city can become smart as the SRCIB is comprehensive.
1
Authors: Stefan Zeranski, Ibrahim E. Sancak
Published: Feb 2021
Authors: Stefan Zeranski, Ibrahim E. Sancak
Published: Feb 2021
Abstract The U.S. financial markets faced an unprecedented rapid decline and recovery on May 6, 2010, known as the May 6 flash crash. Roughly one trillion $ market value in less than thirty minutes vanished with the biggest one-day point decline in the history of the DJIA at the time. Since the market events took place in electronic markets, and algorithmic trading and high-frequency trading, parts of FinTech, played significant roles, we handle the May 6 flash crash from the FinTech, SupTech, and financial supervision perspectives. With the flashback method, we analyzed the reactions of market participants, media, and two financial supervisors, the SEC, and the CFTC, to the market crash. We find that the technological imbalance between financial markets or institutions and their supervisors drove the markets in uncertainty, hence in a fear and panic environment. Since the imbalance has not diminished yet, the same risks still exist. As a remedy, we introduce a new concept and model with a well-functioning SupTech system to cope with the May 6 type FinTech crises.
1
Authors: Jérôme Payet
Published: Feb 2021
Authors: Jérôme Payet
Published: Feb 2021
Global warming represents a major subject on all society levels including governments, economic actors and citizens. The textile industry is often considered a polluting activity. In this project, French textile manufacturers sought to quantify the carbon footprint (CF) of sold clothes and household linen using Life Cycle Assessment in France for the purpose of reducing it to meet the constraints of Paris Agreement by 2050. First, manufacturers calculated the carbon footprint of 17 clothes and household linen products and established alternative scenarios for four production routes. Secondly, they modeled the supply of the upstream sector through different countries. Based on imports of textile products, their calculated CF for one French person reaches 442 kg of CO2eq/year. Means of action to reduce this carbon footprint by a factor of 6 (74 kg of CO2eq/person/year for textiles) are calculated and are the following: installing the most energy-intensive production processes in a country with a low carbon electricity mix, avoiding unsold goods, implementing eco-design approaches and enhancing the value of end-of-life products with reuse or recycling. Therefore, CF for textiles per capita is reduced to 43 kg CO2eq/year which goes beyond the objectives of Paris Agreement and facilitates carbon neutrality in the textile sector. The first priority for reducing the French carbon footprint of clothes and household linen would be to locate textile production in countries with (i) low carbon electricity, (ii) to reduce unsold items, and (iii) to elaborate ecodesign of product including circular economy.
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Authors: Philip Kotler, Hermawan Kartajaya, Abdullah Alaydrus
Published: Feb 2021
Authors: Philip Kotler, Hermawan Kartajaya, Abdullah Alaydrus
Published: Feb 2021
Amid globalization and digitalization, market access is relatively more difficult due to various obstacles caused by political and social forces. Large enterprises with limited control over regulation-making with values not in sync with the society experience difficulty accessing markets. Megamarketing represents an effort by business enterprises to counter closed market access by way of managing two “mega” forces: political and social power. The practice of megamarketing has considerably evolved with the changing times -- considering the increasingly significant role of society, preventive interventions, and political forces. Business enterprises can apply megamarketing by (1) better understanding the political and social landscape, (2) integrating relevant organizational functions, and (3) addressing the issues that restrict market access.
1
Authors: Mieke Meurs, Lisa Giddings
Published: Feb 2021
Authors: Mieke Meurs, Lisa Giddings
Published: Feb 2021
Care of elderly family members affects the welfare of the elderly and caregivers and has macroeconomic implications. In Eastern Europe, aging populations combined with under-developed care policy increase family care burdens, but the impact of care on labour force participation is understudied in this context. Using two waves of the Generations and Gender survey, we estimate the impact of care demand on paid employment in Bulgaria. We find that living with an elderly or disabled parent has a negative impact on employment for women and that this impact cannot be explained by reverse causality or unobserved individual characteristics. More developed care policy would benefit caregivers and would be likely to generate broader fiscal benefits.
1
Authors: Joss Greene
Published: Feb 2021
Authors: Joss Greene
Published: Feb 2021
While prior research shows how community-based organizations (CBO’s) create new social ties and solidarities, we know less about CBO’s that formalize preexisting relationships of care. Analyzing transgender nonprofits as a strategic case, this article develops the concept of kinship organizations: organizations that incorporate norms, networks, and resources from kinship systems into a formal organization that provides regular social services. Drawing on 7 months of ethnography and 36 formal interviews with staff and clients, I explore how transgender kinship organizations function, develop, and impact broader transgender community. Kinship organizations are highly responsive to crisis, are able to leverage personal and organizational resources, and are therefore capable of providing personalized rapid-response care to very precarious transgender people. On the other hand, subsuming kinship within a nonprofit transforms relationships of mutual care into unidirectional service relationships and relationships of chosen family into work-based hierarchies. This account of kinship organizations contributes to the theory on organizational development and provides new conceptual tools for analyzing boundaries between organizations and communities.
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