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9
Date Added: May 12, 2021
Authors: Julia Marin Hellwege, Thomas Mrozla, Keenan Knutelski
Date Added: May 12, 2021
Authors: Julia Marin Hellwege, Thomas Mrozla, Keenan Knutelski
7
Date Added: May 12, 2021
Authors: Stuti S. Kokkalera
Date Added: May 12, 2021
Authors: Stuti S. Kokkalera
3
Date Added: May 12, 2021
Authors: Pieter Leloup, Adam White
Date Added: May 12, 2021
Authors: Pieter Leloup, Adam White
Recent Continental European scholarship has identified a problematic Anglocentric bias running through the field of comparative plural policing studies. It has sought to counter this bias by emphasizing a series of divergent plural policing trajectories between the more market-friendly countries in the Anglosphere and the more state-centric countries in Continental Europe. While acknowledging the significance of this corrective, we argue that it tends to overemphasize the levels of divergence between these two regions. We substantiate this claim by examining the rise of the private security industry and its regulation by the state in the UK (representing the Anglosphere) and Belgium (representing Continental Europe). Interpreting historical and contemporary data through Sabatier and Weible’s advocacy coalition framework, which focuses on the cut and thrust of democratic politics, we observe how in both countries this important dimension of the plural policing landscape is characterized not by counterposed market-friendly and state-centric trajectories, but rather by a complex mix of state–market interactions. In other words, the dynamics of private security regulation are more state-centric in the UK and more market-friendly in Belgium than recent Continental European scholarship suggests. Moreover, we illustrate how, under conditions of post-financial crisis austerity, the overarching pattern is, if anything, one of convergence towards a common set of political dynamics. This is an important finding that not only makes an original contribution towards private security regulation scholarship but also encourages us to question the nature of Anglocentric bias within comparative plural policing studies.
3
Date Added: May 12, 2021
Authors: William Andrew Stadler, Cheryl Lero Jonson, Brooke Miller Gialopsos
Date Added: May 12, 2021
Authors: William Andrew Stadler, Cheryl Lero Jonson, Brooke Miller Gialopsos
Despite a recent surge of visitation and frequent media accounts of lawlessness in America’s national parks, little empirical research has been dedicated to crime and law enforcement in the U.S. national park system. The absence of systematic crime and justice research within these protected spaces should raise concern, as recent park service data and intra-agency reports suggest visitor growth, funding and personnel declines, operational shortcomings, and technology constraints may endanger the capacity of the National Park Service (NPS) to adequately address anticipated crime threats in the 21st century. This call for research aims to raise awareness of the contemporary law enforcement challenges facing this federal agency and encourage the study of crime and justice issues within the U.S. national park system. We briefly examine the evolution and current state of NPS law enforcement and its associated challenges and conclude with a conceptual road map for future research occurring in these protected spaces.
3
Date Added: May 12, 2021
Authors: Irene Chu, Mai Chi Vu
Date Added: May 12, 2021
Authors: Irene Chu, Mai Chi Vu
Abstract The concept of the self and its relation to moral action is complex and subject to varying interpretations, not only between different academic disciplines but also across time and space. This paper presents empirical evidence from a cross-cultural study on the Buddhist and Confucian notions of self in SMEs in Vietnam and Taiwan. The study employs Hwang’s Mandala Model of the Self, and its extension into Shiah’s non-self-model, to interpret how these two Eastern philosophical representations of the self, the Confucian relational self and Buddhist non-self, can lead to moral action. By demonstrating the strengths of the model, emphasizing how social and cultural influences constrain the individual self and promote the social person leading to moral action, the paper extends understanding of the self with empirical evidence of the mechanisms involved in organizational contexts.
3
Date Added: May 12, 2021
Authors: Michael T. Rossler, Michael J. Suttmoeller
Date Added: May 12, 2021
Authors: Michael T. Rossler, Michael J. Suttmoeller
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